Congratulations Almost-Dr. Esch!

Congratulations to Mike Esch, who successfully defended this Ph.D. dissertation this week! Mike has done excellent work on a number of topics, including lead halide perovskites, cyanine dyes, conical intersection “locality,” and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics methods for dense manifolds of electronic states. Lucky for us, Mike will be staying on as a postdoc in our group!

Congratulations, Derek Metcalf!

Congratulations to Derek Metcalf, former undergraduate researcher in our group, for earning a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship!  After graduating MSU in 2018, Derek joined the Ph.D. program at Georgia Tech, where he now working in the group of David Sherrill.  Keep up the good work, Derek!

Congratulations, Yinan Shu!

It’s nice to be able to share some good news.

Yinan Shu was named a 2020 PHYS Division Young Investigators by the ACS PHYS division:

http://phys-acs.org/postdocs/2020.html

Yinan was one of the first Levine group members, joining in 2011 and earning his PhD in 2016.  During his time here he lead a number of projects, ranging from semiconductor photophysics to electronic structure method development to the automated design of light emitting molecules.  He is currently a postdoc in the group of Don Truhlar at University of Minnesota.

Nice work, Yinan, and very well deserved!

Congratulations, almost-Dr. Peng!

Congratulations to Wei-Tao for successfully defending his dissertation today!  Wei-Tao has done excellent work on several projects (silicon defect photophysics, cyanine photochemistry, and time-dependent electronic structure method development).  In a couple of months Wei-Tao will join the group of Jochen Blumberger at University College London as a postdoc.  We can’t wait to see the great things he will do there and beyond!

 

New Year’s Eve Featured Article in JCP on Roaming H2

Check out our most recently article with the Dantus group, investigating the formation of H3+ by H2 roaming in thiols, for comparison with our past work in alcohols.  Though easier to ionize, H3+ yields in thiols are actually lower than in equivalent alcohols.  Electronic structure calculations carried out by recently-graduated Dantus group member and friend of the group Muath Nairat provide an interesting explanation.

Also, congrats to Muath, who is starting a postdoc in the Schlau-Cohen group at MIT!

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